— At the base of Mount Kenya, the town of Nanyuki and surrounding rural areas are benefiting from solar-powered wireless internet transmitted via underutilized broadband bandwidth. Towers like this one in downtown Nanyuki transmit wireless internet by utilizing unused broadcast bandwidth, also known as Mawingu Networks transmits its wireless internet signal to both Gakawa Secondary School (pictured here) and Burguret High School.  Mawingu means Students at Gakawa Secondary School use the internet in the computer lab. A teacher guides students in the computer lab at Gakawa Secondary School. Students in a classroom at Gakawa Secondary School. Burguret Secondary School students Students at Gakawa Secondary School. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella speaks with Jane Kagendo, principal at Burguret High School, on a walk to the school's computer lab. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella participates in a Skype call at Gakawa Secondary School. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella participates in a Skype call at Gakawa Secondary School. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella observes students at work at Burguret High School. University of Southampton economist Richard Thanki works on a computer at Burguret High School. A student at Gakawa Secondary School uses the internet in the computer lab. Students at Gakawa Secondary School return to the courtyard with their lunch. Several students at Gakawa Secondary School have lunch outside. Students studying outside at Burguret High School. Students at Burguret High School carry their chairs to the next classroom at Burguret High School. Students on break at Burguret High School. Students play soccer in a field at Burguret High School. A greenhouse at the Tambuzi rose farm.  Tambuzi employees use internet provided by Mawingu Networks to communicate with their customers all around the world. Workers in the greenhouse at the Tambuzi rose farm. One of the fifty varieties of roses grown at the Tambuzi farm. A worker moves roses from the greenhouse to the production floor. Workers transport freshly harvested roses to a refrigerated room to await packaging. A Tambuzi rose in a safety enclosure. Flower buckets at the Tambuzi rose farm. An employee packages roses in the workroom at the Tambuzi rose farm. An employee packages roses in the workroom at the Tambuzi rose farm. An employee packages roses in the workroom at the Tambuzi rose farm. An employee packages roses in the workroom at the Tambuzi rose farm. A discard pile of stems and roses that didn't make the cut. In addition to the fifty varieties of roses, floral and culinary herbs are also grown at Tambuzi. Lavender fields at the Tambuzi farm. A field of Bishop's flower at the Tambuzi farm. A worker harvests Bishop's flower in the field at the Tambuzi farm. A worker harvests Bishop's flower in the field at the Tambuzi farm. A worker harvests Bishop's flower in the field at the Tambuzi farm. A worker sorts Bishop's flower at the Tambuzi farm. Workers package Bishop's flower at the Tambuzi farm. With the help of internet provided by Mawingu Networks, the Tambuzi farm sells more than 5 million roses each year to florists around the world.
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